Trillium Book Awards Author Reading 2015

SHAUN SMITH'S SUNDAY SUNDRIES

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A WEEKLY ROUNDUP OF INTERNET CURIOSITIES FROM THE BOOK WORLD

BURNING BOOK
I would encourage readers to buy this book. Not because it is a great piece of literature. I haven't cracked it open myself, nor have I read any reviews of it. But because it seems (according to Salon.com) that some right-wing Christian wackos in West Bend, Wisconsin, are actually petitioning to burn the book.

SMOKE 'EM IF YOU GOT 'EM
In the Financial Times' Book Covers column, Edwin Heathcote gives a fascinating dissection of the cover of a new edition of Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray. What's most interesting about the cover — apparently based on 1970s Gitanes adverts — is that it displays no title, author name or publisher name, yet is thoroughly compelling.

COVER CONFUSION
Dan Wagstaff, the Casual Optimist, tweaks us to last year's best book covers according to AIGA ("formerly an acronym for the 'American Institute of Graphic Arts'", Wikipedia tells us). Reads their site: "the 'AIGA 50 books/50 Covers' competition selected a group of 91 examples of outstanding book and book cover design produced in 2008." Confused yet? Me too. Still, the covers are worth checking out.

MONKEY BUSINESS
As Steven Page sang, "Haven't you always wanted a monkey?" In a Guardian gallery of illustrations by Anthony Browne monkeys are everywhere.

TEN TO FORGET
The three book amigos at the Toronto Star — Dan Smith (no relation), Geoff Pevere & Vit Wagner — have weighed in on their picks for the ten most important books of the first decade of the century. I haven't read any of them and probably won't, but that's just me. And I predict if you come back in 50 years, all ten will be forgotten, but that too is just me. See them here.

CRAPPING ON THE CURMUDGEONS
Ross Douthat in the NYTs craps all over the new book Digital Barbarism: A Writer’s Manifesto, Mark Helprin's curmudgeonly screed against the Internet, blogs, and the contest over copyright. Sometimes reviews can backfire. Regardless of whether Douthat thinks Helprin is out to lunch or not, I immediately wanted to read the book when Douthat quoted Helprin as calling the blogosphere “a My Little Pony version of the Khmer Rouge.” Heck, anyone deserves to be in print if they can write that well.

DAD ON THE GRILL
Today is Father's Day! Light the bbq!

The views expressed in the Writer-in-Residence blogs are those held by the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Open Book: Toronto.

Shaun Smith

Shaun Smith is a novelist and journalist living in Toronto. His young adult novel Snakes & Ladders was published in January 2009 by the Dundurn Group.

Go to Shaun Smith ’s Author Page